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Tuesday, March 7, 2017

The 2nd Armored Division (Forward), Lucius D. Clay Kaserne, Garlstedt, FRG


By JIM PURCELL
Former Intel Analyst, 
4th Bn, 41st Infantry Regiment 
"Fix Bayonets" Battalion
2nd Armored Division (Forward)

I was trying to find a few photos of Lucius D. Clay Kaserne, Garlstedt, then-Federal Republic of Germany (circa mid-1980s) and could not find any. At the time, East Germany was known as the German Democratic Republic -- ironically (not a lot of 'democratic' anything going on over there from what I saw). I learned the U.S. Army re-designated a kaserne in Wiesbaden Lucius D. Clay many years after I left Germany, so I am writing about the original Lucius D. Clay Kaserne, which I was stationed at while I served. Afterward, I figured I would post about it because there was not that much on it anywhere else on the Internet. All I found was this rather grainy, black-and-white photo that was undated and really only gives a sense of the kaserne itself. Even a lot of the story of the kaserne has been lost. So, without any further adieu, here is something about LDCK.
41st Infantry Regtiment

I arrived to Lucius D. Clay Kaserne in early December, 1986 from the 21st Replacement Detachment, in Frankfurt. I was transferred from Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and there had been winter there -- but nothing like what I had experienced in Frankfurt, and certainly nothing like what I came to find at LDCK, in Garlstedt. 

At the time, the kaserne hosted the 2nd Armored Division (Forward), which was an 'infantry heavy' forward brigade of the 2nd Armored Division (Main), then based at Fort Hood, Texas. I was at the replacement for the Division (Forward) for a brief time and then assigned to HHC, 4th Battalion, 41st Infantry. The other infantry battalion on post was the 1st Battalion, 41st Infantry. The 2nd Battalion, 66th Armored Regiment was also headquartered there. To the best of my ability to remember, so was the 4th Battalion, 3rd Field Artillery Regiment; a signal battalion and a support battalion (whose designation I have forgotten over the years).

I caught pneumonia almost immediately at LDCK. though back then that was no reason to go on Sick Call let alone go to the hospital. In fact, the Army back then had its flaws -- common sense sometimes lacking being one of them. Eventually I was treated for pneumonia, though it was only when it nearly became very bad. 
66th Armored Regiment

LDCK was a small kaserne with its own LTA (Limited Training Area). It was one of the first places where the Bradley Fighting Vehicles (M2 Bradley Fighting Vehicle, M3 Scout Vehicle) were introduced. Every soldier was required to attend the HOW Academy once at LDCK. "HOW" stood for "Hell on Wheels."

According to the fine folks at the HOW Academy, the 2nd Armored (Forward) came to Northern Germany in 1978, as a result of a decision by then-President Jimmy Carter to assist British operations in the NorthAG (Northern Army Group) of NATO. The Division (Forward) as it was known, supported operations of a British armored division, as I recall. And, the British had operational control of the Division (Forward) in sector. Indeed, later on, when 4/41 Inf. rotated back to Fort Hood, in 1988, its final pass in review at LDCK was taken by a British two star and his wife. And, in general, there were infrequent visitors in garrison by British Army dignitaries, though this was known to me only by reading The Forward Edge, which was the kaserne's local newspaper. 

So, I was assigned to the S-2 Section at 4-41, which was known as the "Fix Bayonets" battalion because it was the greeting between officers and enlisted men upon passing. The 1st Battalion, 41st Infantry held the greeting "Straight and Stalwart" and the 2nd Battalion, 66th Armored Regiment  greeted each other as "Iron Knights."

My NCOIC (Non Commissioned Officer In-Charge) initially was SFC Craig Fisher, who was a 25 year soldier, the Intel Sergeant at the section when I first arrived. He was a long-time 'Germany soldier' who had spent most of his years in uniform in the FRG. SFC Fisher was an infantry soldier, and was given the position of S-2 NCOIC. I learned some history from him about the unit. At the time I arrived, 4-41 was in itself relatively new, as it had recently been designated such after being the 2nd Battalion, 50th Infantry Regiment when he originally arrived at LDCK (what year that was I have no idea anymore). 

There was something different about this post. It was located in 'cow country' in Northern Germany. The locals were a mixed bag: Younger people seemed to enjoy the young, wild GIs from the Division (Forward) in the nearby towns -- Osterholz-Scharmbeck, Bremerhaven, Bremen. Meanwhile, many older Germans gave off the distinct impression they did not, though largely they were courteous to us. I lived on the economy, in Osterholz-Scharmbeck, with my wife at the time. 

As well as being among the first units to receive Bradleys, 2nd Armored (Forward) was also among the first to receive the then-brand new MI Abrams Main Battle Tank. Another first was that infantrymen (originally designated 11B) from LDCK were among the first to go through specialized Bradley training to become the MOS 11M (a Bradley designator for infantrymen). Of some note, when the M1 first was fielded, it had a 105mm main gun, which was later dropped in favor of the 120mm main gun. And, while I was at LDCK, its improvements included going from homogenous steel to depleted uranium. Only later in my tenure at LDCK would the M1 receive the designation M1A1.

At the time, the Division (Forward) was commanded by then-Brigadier General Tommy Baucum. He was flamboyant, and very well regarded by everyone within the command. Meanwhile, 4-41 Infantry was commanded by LTC John Voessler, who was someone I came to respect very much and who taught so many of us so much. Of some note, I find no reference to LTC Voessler's name anywhere online associated with 4-41 Infantry, which is a shame because "Pale Rider," as was his fixed call-sign, deserves to be remembered with the unit he cared so deeply for in its history. 

There were some hallmarks of service at 4-41 Infantry, as well as the rest of the units at LDCK. The Division (Forward) spent an inordinate amount of time in the field, compared to either the units I had served in at Fort Bragg, North Carolina or in Ft. Ord, California. 

The weather was harsh. Division (Forward) soldiers were very used to operating in extreme cold environments and cold-weather safety was second nature to everyone. Where soldiers from Southern Germany used to receive cold weather training in Northern Germany every year, the Division (Forward) (which was the northern most home of American maneuver forces in Europe) annually received its cold weather training in Boris and Oksbol, Denmark. There was a former refugee camp in Oksbol that had been converted into military use over the years and regularly headquartered visiting units. Boris and Oksbol are the coldest places where I have ever been and never before or since have I seen anti-freeze freeze. 

The Division (Forward) was in garrison more than its three maneuver battalions, and it was no surprise if one or two of its maneuver battalions were gone at the same time doing some training or other somewhere. 

Between regular gunnery in Grafenwohr-Hohenfels, REFORGER, certain rail exercises, cold weather training or whatever else came down the pike, 2nd Armored Division (Forward) soldiers were, it seemed then and now, mostly living in the field. However, the 'field' was occasionally different from what I was used to as a soldier. This unit was very good at rail movements for armored vehicles, which is art and science. Railcars we used to transport M113s, Bradleys, M1A1s, M88s and the like and were not designed to such specifications perfectly. And, these vehicles only just fit on the railcars. If drivers or ground guides were as much as a few inches off when guiding these behemoths onto these cars, these vehicles would have capsized onto the ground. How could that be good for anyone? So, one either learned how to do this well, or things became very scary. 

There were times when encampments were in occupied villages or towns, or just outside of them. There were times when armored vehicles convoyed on busy public highways or thoroughfares. Maneuver training sometimes happened in areas occupied by German nationals, though the Army went out of its way to work as unobtrusively as possible. Frequently, American units worked with Dutch, FRG and British forces. In one instance, the Division (Forward) even worked with elements of the French Army in training.

In short, garrison life was short-lived in the "Iron Deuce." In the rear soldiers, particularly those from the maneuver battalions and the artillery battalion, seemed to be given some leeway with schedules to allow for time with families and time off. The soldiers were young and prone to frequently going out and getting in trouble the way that soldiers have always, in time immemorial fashion.  At the kaserne, though, in my experience at 4-41, vehicle maintenance, field readiness, personal fitness and tactical training were paramount. Yes, the fellows were given a longer rope than ordinarily back at the kaserne, but no one wanted to be on the wrong side of training requirements. Business was business. 
Then Specialist Jim Purcell at the Hohenfels Training Area (1987)

The Division (Forward) was a family, in the truest sense of any word I have ever known. In 4-41, we knew each other better than our wives and loved ones did, we certainly spent more time with each other in almost every condition than they did. It was a clannish place, where friendship was taken very seriously, and soldiers were very lucky to have leaders they could generally respect very much. Good leadership is not something assured in every army, at every post, at every time. This was a very combat-ready unit that was used to working in extremely harsh weather and terrain environments and which was easily able to work with a wide array of NATO units. By modern standards, I suppose, much of its equipment was antiquated and basic. Still, if given the choice, 4-41 Infantry and the Division (Forward) would have been and still is my first choice to have served in would the balloon have gone up for the Third World War in Europe during the 1980s.

I was made a corporal in Germany, and after returning to Fort Hood, Texas, in 1988 with the unit, an exception was made and I was assigned as the S-2 intelligence sergeant. Normally, the S-2 NCOIC job went to a senior infantry non-commissioned officer. However, the then-commander, LTC John Vermillion, thought it was a good idea to retain me there instead -- and I was promoted to sergeant, E-5 and served at this despite being an intelligence analyst and not serving in an infantry MOS at that time. 

No one can capture the whole spirit of a unit with words, or pictures. These are the things left to memory, sad to say since memory is such a fallible thing. It was the finest unit I ever served in, though, and there were many fine units I was assigned to during my tenure in the Army. However, those are other stories. 







99 comments:

  1. Hello Mr Purcell ,Thank you so much for this post.You did a fine job of describing life at Garlstedt .When I was there in 1986 , the units were...3-41 ..4-41 inf ,2-66 armor ,4/3 FA (me)...498 support btn ....2/1 air cav and a combat engineer co.

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    1. I was a 12bravo with destablished company 17th engineers 86-89! Great times in northern germany.

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    2. 3-41 left in May 1986 and 1–41 came. That’s when I arrived. Col baccum never made BG. Great times go back often

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    3. I was stationed at Luscious D Clay kaserne from 1979 t0 1981. I worked in the clinic as a medical specialist assigned to med co 498th support battalion. I was also in charge of ambulance section. I loved it there.

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    4. Mike, are you from Chicago? Just asking I had a friend with the same name in the same unit stationed there till the early ninetees. Thanks, Andreas from Muenster, now Florida

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  2. Nice read brother. I was with 3-66 Armor...the COHORT unit that traded places with 4-41 in '88. LDCK was a great post and your writing brought back many good memories from so long ago. Thank you, Burt's Knights!

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    1. I was at the Unit 1982-84 and in the Artillery COHORT unit, I believe our armor COHORT brothers followed along our Artillery route from Basic, AIT then W. Germany.

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  3. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  4. Great article I was with B 2/50 Infantry
    80-82

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    1. We were there at the same period.i was senior medic working under major Dr John J Lammie as medical specialist assigned to 498th med co

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  5. I was with A 3/41 inf (mech) 2ad fwd when it was first built. we were sent there in 1978 from ft hood. best 2 years of my life were spent there. still miss it sometimes.

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  6. Thanks for bringing back some fond and not so fond memories. I wad there from Nov.86 to Nov.88......2/66TH HHC. Some of my best times were spent in Bremen and bremerhaven amongst the locals. I seem to remember a rather crazy protest at the main gate by those that wanted us gone. Leave for cancelled because of it. I also remember being issued the then new Humvees. Thankful I never had to go out in the original Gamagoat. Some really good times spent at the British bases and out in the country side while out on one of the many field problems you spoke of. Remember wearing the dang MOPP suit for two weeks straight. Thought I'd smelled bad before.......
    Three cold was unbelievable for me being from the southwest. That first winter was nuts. Again thanks for bringing this all back.
    Clint
    IRON KNIGHTS

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  7. I was a member of delta company 17th engineer battalion from 86-89. Combat engineer that hated Graf and hohenfels,spent 2 weeks in OKs bold Denmark in 87. Coldest I've ever been in my life! Wouldn't trade any of it for anything. Loved my time in garlstedt. We were truly the baddest division in germany.

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  8. 1981-1982 Bravo Co. 3/41 Inf. Well described.
    Anyone, Denmark during reforger?

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    1. I went to Denmark twice with them. Copenhagen rocked!

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    2. 80-83..1 1/14th fa... Loved Denmark

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    3. I crewed a 58 to the HQ in 82,
      Was lucky to work with the Dutch , Brits Germans, tried to drink with them and hurt my self.
      Made my Six under, col. Solomon.
      Hooah

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  9. I was stationed LDK from 1983 to 1986 loved it best time of my life I was in a cohort unit from ft Carson coladodo 11b 4-41 Inf really miss Germany at times ty for the memories

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    1. Ron Robishaw, we were in the same platoon. Maybe squad.

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    2. Mr Robishaw,
      You CO was Captain Miles when we were in Galkatraz, I was his driver. I was in HQ platoon.
      Many good times in Bremerhaven for sure. 38 years later
      J. Nelson

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    3. I was in 4/3 from 1987-1991 in Service battery as motor sargeant for Charlie battery then in desert storm hq battery motor sargeant. Also got promoted to sfc there was a good tour.

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  10. I was there too from 1986 to 1989 in 4/3FA. No one believes that we went to the field as much as we say we did, however only the ones that served at LDCK 2nd AD(FWD) will know and agree that we went to the field A LOT !!! However we were the only line of defense for Northern Germany and the closest combat unit to East Berlin at the time. I will never forget the experiences and friends I made at LDCK 2nd AD(FWD) !!!

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    1. Brother, I was with 4-41 Inf. We were in the field 8 months out of 12. If anyone wants to argue about it, I will attest to it.

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    2. 4/3 Bravo FA 2AD 88 to 89 cohort.

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  11. I was in E 4-41 as a 11B assigned to a TOW track
    From 1983 to 1985 My LTC was, LTC Seitz. Call sign: Psycho.
    That was also his name among the troops, He was extremely into bayonet training and running.
    We too went around shouting “Fix Bayonets” when saluting. The artillery units motto was “Brass Balls”, one time as we left the post theater after a briefing by the post commander the Artillery guys where ahead of us (not in formation) they saw a group of female officers walking toward them.
    They spontaneously spread out even further so as to force the officers to return numerous salutes, all the while shouting “Brass Balls Ma am’”, this continued until they wised up and took a detour. A memorable moment.

    I will agree that, that post was one of the coldest places I have ever lived. That said, we once went to Denmark and fired TOW missiles at a barge in the North Sea, in January. Setting on the beach waiting to fire was perhaps the coldest I have ever been. We wore every bit of cold weather gear (except for our mickey mouse boots) that we were issued.
    The mess tent was handing out Spam soup (it wasn’t bad at all) but before we could get back to our position it had solidified in to a cup of grease.

    Don’t forget the Viking graves on the North side of post with each grave fenced in with 6 ft chain-link fencing.

    When I was there, Ronald Reagan was president and there was a lot of anti-American sentiment, particularly in December 1983 in to spring of 1984 we had student protesters at the gate at least twice. And when in convoy we saw a sea of one finger salutes. Yet after awhile it all calmed down and went back to normal.
    Once there was a supposed Soviet monitor in the area and we all had mandatory briefings on not harming them. We where to block them in if possible, but under no circumstances where we to touch or otherwise harm them. I can’t remember what they were called.

    As for loading a train, that is when you learned to trust the ground guide, because you could not see the rail car, all you could see was the long drop to the ground.

    Thanks for the well written post and the trip down memory lane.

    Donald Watson

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    1. I was there in 1984 to 1987 bring back a lot of memories. It was so cold . 441 fix bayonets sp4 ROBERT JORDAN

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  12. I was at LDCK from 1982 to 1987, such great memories. I was lucky enough to drive a GAMAGOAT. Almost got killed in of those during one of our many, many, field exercises to Hohenfels. Thanks for the memories my brothers and if any of have pictures of the base, please share them. My Polaroids disintegrated before I could transfer them to digits.

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  13. Great description. I was there from 85 to 88, 11C with Fix Bayonets.

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  14. i was in d company 17th in garlstadt too 1983-85

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  15. I actually was one of the poor guys that brought the 2AD(Fwd) to Garlstedt from Ft Hood. I was the PSNCO for the 2/50 Infantry. What a mess. When we arrived it wasn't finished yes and we had to stay in Hohenfels Training Area. Are they had was open barracks with the latrines in separate buildings which meant going out in the snow whenever you had to go. We stayed there at least 3 months but it ma have been more. We finally got to Garlstedt and the whole place was one big mudhole. No sidewalks, no grass, few roads. But the barracks were great! I later transferred to the 498th Support Battalion. While there my job was to meet the replacement train from Frankfurt very very early in the morning and bring the newbys to their new assignments. I was later transferred to Washington State National Guard.

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    1. Clay Kaserne was not finished when i arrived Jan 79, the PX & Class 6 were in a trailer. I was in HHC 498th Spt Bn worked in Tech Supply i the warehouse for a little while, the Property Book Office. Being from Philly i thought i could handle the cold, no way very cold there.Does anyone remember the blizzard in 79 we were stuck in the barracks. Does anyone remember the club in Osterholz- Scharmbeck or the place that sold the rotisserie chicken and ham hocks



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    2. I was the first replacement soldier after the initial tdy folks left. I remember the dam snow and the ox and class six in trailers. The clubs in osterholz scharmbeck from what I remember we're vampys and stagges hotel and several other gastettes

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    3. I transferred from A 3/41 to CSC 2/50 Tow plt back in 79 to 81. I was with Willie Johnson.

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  16. Was there from Feb 85-Feb 88 in the 498th spt. My fist duty station right out of AIT. Didn't spend as much time in the field as 41st INF, 66th ARM or 4/3rd FA but we had teams that supported them at least once a month with a lot of time in Bergen. Many great memories of Bremen at a club called Aladiin's, right next to the ST. Pauli girl brewery. Can't forget Racy's either.

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    1. I was there from 81-84. Loved it. I was in 11th Signal Corp and husband in 17th Eng. Very cold but a wonderful post to be stationed at. Many memories.

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    2. I was in HHC, 498th from 1984 until 1987. It was awful. My CO was Samuel Bullware and an awful Commander.

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  17. Stationed there 6/80-2/83 ... HHB 1/14 FA ... Was a forward observer and went to the field with 250 341 and 266... Lots of good memories

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    1. Holy shit... Same here... Went by the name Tank.. was fo for 5th and then 6th platoon... Who are u?

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    2. Don Estes I was in C trp 2/1 Cav. Was one of the first there when it opened.

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    3. You must have been my replacement. I went on training missions with all those units, including the 1/14. And also the heavy mortar unit which went to the field on a different date. I spent 263 days in the field in 1979. I left behind a green VW because I was immediately ordered to TACFIRE school at Fort Sill.

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  18. I was a cav platoon leader with C Trp, 2/1 Cav and deployed from Ft. Hood to Garlstedt in Jan 1979 for the initial stationing. In June 79 I became the aide de camp to the CG, BG James Armstrong. Garlstedt was a mudhole initially, the PX was in a trailer, but by 1980 most things were constructed. German-American relations were a big thing then as Americans had never been stationed in Northern Germany before. Great memories being the "first" there.

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    1. That was my unit and time I was there.

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    2. I was the first tank turret mechanic sent in Jan 1979 I was a tiny dude. I remember zeroing the m 60s tanks with a new method on the side of the motor pool that we shared with the 2 66 armor. Thomas bartlebaugh

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  19. Anthony Anderson(Andy)November 12, 2019 at 9:02 PM

    I was in D co 17th Engineers from Nov 1985 to nov 1987, my first unit in the Army. I agree with jim the camaraderie at LDCK, was so close,mainly because we were always busy and on the go. I remember when they put in the Burger King, and the Clothing sales was still,a little red building.BG gen streeter was the post commander. I went on to a great career and retired in 2006, but have lots of memories of 2nd ad fwd, and times up there in cow country.

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    1. I was in that same unit for 15 months. I arrived there in December 1981 and left in March of 1983. I spent lots of time in Bremahaven but I went to Frankfurt and Munich. Spent sometime in Oldenburg as well. Got to go to Denmark and Austria as well. As an engineer I had the privilege of going places where others didn't get to go. I went on to complete my career in the military by serving in the National Guard but I'll always have fond memories of my tour there. I didn't like it there at first sight but had I stayed on active duty, I would've stayed right there.

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  20. I was there went C 2-66 when to CAT with M60A1 and the new M1

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    1. I remember that, you guys were the best in the north, south, east and west. there was no better anywhere. respect.

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    2. Mark I was working as the senior medic at troop medical at the time.specialist Soares 498 med.

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    3. I was maintenance support for you guys out of 498th. Was with you guys on many a CAT shoots. Best in the land back in them days. ‘83-‘85

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  21. My 1st Duty station was with c Battery 1/14th F.A in 1981, and I loved it so much that when I was back in Ft.Sill, I reenlisted and actually came back to the exact same unit in 1984, it changed to the 4/3rd shortly after. I rememember when you proud Tankers came rolling in on the M-1 Abrams and the Bradleys shortly after that, we had the M109A1 155mm SpP Howitzers. We certainly had the finest equipment in the Army. Winters were harsh, our Battery Commander was relieved because 30 of us caught frost nip and had p-3 profiles for 2 months. Denmark was cool, I snuck out of Oskbol one night and was partying with some locals and some Mp's walked in, a Dane gave me his long heavy jacket just in time, and I didn't get caught. We got to go to the original LEGOLAND and tour Nazi bunkers on the coast. We got a Burger King in 1986 I believe. I left in 1987 with a german wife who left me in the states, married another G.I. and he was stationed in the very same unit, and all my old friends got to see my wife again with her new husband..crazy shit. I came back for a 3rs tour and the put me in a shithole called babenhausen, boy we had it made in Garlstedt

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    1. My husband and I were there 83-86. Lived in the village Stotel with our daughter. We were part of the COHORT unit that left in 86 for Ft. Hood TX. We did not get to enjoy the BK on post. But we did drive to Frankfort once just for Pizza Hut pizza...lol The Autobahn was amazing to drive, Good memories for sure.."STRAIGHT AND STALWART"

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    2. I was there from 86 to 90 and LTC Kevin Byrnes (Later a 3 star General) Wound up be my bases commander later on when I was a Ft Hood. That was pretty cool... unfortunate that he was eventually relieved due to a relationship before a divorce was final (even though they had been separated for 1 1/2 years already) it was just BS I thought. He was a good Commander even though he did give me an Article 15 at one point (the cool thing was doing my extra duty in Graf) :-)

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  22. Nice to see.many memories thank you
    3/41

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  23. Really nice to see many memories
    3/41 1980-82

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  24. SSG, Sanchez i was an instructor at the HOW academy with SSG Cherry and 1SGT Hill in charge. Very good times.

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  25. Just reading over some of the comments which i already commented but LDCK was a trip Jan 79 when i arrived px, class vi in trailers. funny thing i left in Aug 81 went to ft Belvoir and returned to LDCK Aug 84 back to the same unit HHC 49th Spt Bn. It was cold
    as crap there and going to Graf every year was a lot of fun

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  26. Was there from 1983 to 1985. I was in the 2nd armored div. maintenance Batt. Greatest military base I was ever on. Rebuilt hydraulics. Thanks so much for your article

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    1. I think my brother was in the same unit. But not exactly sure. His name is Michael Burk. (Wouldn't have been a standout kinda guy, more of one that was in trouble more often than not). I'm looking for anyone that remembers him from then, as I have some info I'm looking for while he was there. Do you remember/know him?

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    2. You remember CW3 Jerry Parker of 3rd shop? I was there ‘83-85. Worked in shop and supported 2/66 with contact truck. A lot of field time.

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  27. Was there from 1983 to 1985. Was in the 2ND Armored Division Maintenance Batt. Rebuilt hydraulics. Best post I was ever on.
    Thanks for your article it brought back good memories

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  28. Was stationed there from 85-88 with my wife and 3 kids. Spent about 3 months in B co 4/41 and then moved to HHC 4/41 in the motor pool working on everything (The BMO found out i had turned wrenches my whole life). We spent probably 8 months out of the year the woods training. Great times and good people

    FIX BAYONETS!!
    Dave Jobe

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    1. And was good at getting Cordell all drunken up!!

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  29. It really was a crazy amount of time in the boonies. I used to say that we weren't training in the field...we were just homeless. lol

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  30. My brother was ther from 83-85. His name is Michael Burk. (Wouldn't have been a standout kinda guy, more of one that was in trouble more often than not). I'm looking for anyone that remembers him from then, as I have some info I'm looking for while he was there. Do anyone remember/know him?

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    1. I was in b company 4/41 84-86 rhskuwait@yahoo.com

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  31. HHC 4-41, "Scout Out" .... The, "Dug-Man" was there in 87'

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  32. I was also stationed their from 83 to 86. I was part of the Cohart Armor unit that arrived in winter. It was cold I was Alpha company 2-66

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  33. 82-85.3/41 LTC Robert Cold Steel Powell..tall Georgian who could swear with the best of them. 1stSgt Charles Taz Cosby one of the finest NCO I ever knew. Bg Thomas Tait..great Brigade/Div Forward Commander

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    1. BG Tait incoming brief was on the parade field, pouring down rain early spring. Carried a big stick he got in Vietnam. Best of the best!! ‘83-‘85

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    2. I remember your unit training to Eye of the Tiger

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  34. Had a great time 82-84 TOW Echo company 250. Only remember platoon Sgt Cortez. My friends, Tim Hamilton, Kelly Fisher and all the rest good luck in life.

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  35. Funny Cold Steel Powell made me get out of my POV to salute him. I drove past him and yelled out Roark get back here. Scared me to death.

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  36. Couldn't find
    My unit 250 my unit 250 m inf

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  37. C Co. 2/50 Mech Inf from 78-80. Best two years of my two+ decades in the Army. Still in touch with my buddies 40+ years later. Disco at Osterholz-Scharmbeck? Check. Bars in Bremerhaven? You bet. Hohenfels? Grafenwoehr? REFORGER? Oh yeah. Blizzard of 79? COLD AS HELL!! Life is good, Y'all

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  38. I was in 3-41 witth the first group that moved into that post in texas we were deactivated as 5/7 cav and reactivated as 3/41 2Ad were then sent to wildficken to move all that equipment to clay this was the late 70s 77 or 78 i think cant remmber but i left there april of 80 discharge ot was like moving into a new house every thing seemed brand new and eeach dorm had a kitchen!

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  39. I was stationed therefrom 80-82 498th support Battalion. It was definitely a great learning experience.

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    1. I was there 1979 to 1981 4th s&t battalion. Motor pool, 64 Charlie (truck driver) name was Lori Mathieu. Can't connect with anyone from Germany. Can't remember any last names, my BFF was Bozo and David, others, Can't remember names, smoked to much hash lol

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  40. 80-82 17th eng, I spent my whole 4 yrs in the 2AD went to ft hood, to garlstedt, straight from train to the field on reforger exercises. Met my now wife of 38 yrs at Pam pams n Hagen, she was 18 I was 20. her parents still own their farm in hahnenknoop. We go back often. Best 2 yrs of my life, no complaints.

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  41. I was in A Co 2/66 armor 88-91.My ets was 9apr91 but at that time I was in iraq(desert storm lol) didn't get ets until June.

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    1. I had a FIST friend that supported 2/66 named Scalabrini... remember him?

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  42. I was in A co. 4/41 inf 1986-1988
    I recently worked for the Army in Vilseck. I dove up to the old Kassern and it a logistic school for the German Army. Yet they kept the original name so it is still called the Lucias Clay Kassern logistic school Deutsche bundeswoehr.

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  43. Thanks for the Articles bring back lots of memories. I was part of Artillery Cohort Unit from 83 to 85. Then back to Ft. Hood. Good Times. Graf, Hohesfeld, Oksbol our second Homes.

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  44. I was there from 80 to 82. HQ&HQ 2nd Army Division Forward. Working in the Special Security Office (SSO). The building was located across from the flag.

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  45. I was in 4/3 field artillery Charlie battery, also had a great time in bremerhaven and Bremen you ain't kidding it was cold worked with the special weapons teams with the nuclear rounds for the howitzers

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    1. Howdy hey... I was in HHB 4/3 FIST supporting C Co 1/41. It was my best time of my life there.

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  46. I was there 83 and 84 4/3 field artillery Charlie battery.yep it was very cold we went to the field all the time I remember this one place was called swanawefede. I don't know if that's how you spell it but I remember that little town we should do some field exercises out there I was in a special weapons team learning how to do the nuclear rounds for the howitzers

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  47. I was there from 82 to 84. Transferred from 1/66 on Fort Hood. Coldest place I have ever lived. Got married to an American girl I met there. Still married to this day. Good memories.

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  48. Arrived late '79, left early '81, served with 1/14 FA service battalion, battalion welder. Was a fun time setting up shop, starting from nothing, wasn't set up too bad by the time I left. Many good memories.

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  49. I first visited there in late 1977 on a trip from Graf while stationed with the 1/78 FA on BGD-75 TDY from Ft. Hood. We went to have some drinks and lunch with the local leaders. They nearly drank us into the ground. By the time early afternoon rolled around, we few soldiers were having to hold each other up. Whenever I got back to Ft. Hood, I volunteered to return with the 1/14 FA. I stayed until early 1980 when the Army suddenly decided I should go to Ft. Sill for TACFIRE school. I hated to leave for several reasons.

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  50. Great read! You did good with the descriptions, brought me back in a good way. I was there from March 87 to 89 and had me a little apartment in Bremen with a girl from Ireland. Some of the best times of my life. Thanks for the memories.

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  51. This was my last assignment to a US Army Division. I initially started out as the 1SG of HHC 1st BN 41st Infantry 2AD (FWD) and then I became the 2AD Community Sergeant Major for the Community Base Operations for 32,000 US Army; US Airforce, US Navy, US Marine, US Coast Guard and US Civilians.
    This was one of my most rewarding assignments in the US Army. I left 2AD (FWD) in 1988 and was reassigned to be the Assistant Professor of Military Science at Clarion University of Pennsylvania, where I retired from active military service.
    "No Slack"

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  52. Hello all... I was in Garlstedt from '86 until January 2nd 1990 as a Fire Support Specialist supporting C Co 1/41. Just thought I'd say hello to all my former friends I've lost contact with. If anybody has heard from or know how to get ahold of who was SFC Ronald Graves (Fire Support Sergeant in the FSE) let me know. Wonder whatever happened to LTC Fox

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